Centre for Secure Housing of Vienna – securing tenancies and preventing evictions

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Centre for Secure Housing of Vienna – securing tenancies and preventing evictions

Policies and regulations

Main objectives of the project

Date

  • 1996:

Stakeholders

  • Fachstelle für Wohnungssicherung

Location

City: Vienna
Country/Region: Austria, Vienna

Description

There are many agencies, both public and civil society, designed to supervise the private rental sector and improve the tenant security. In Vienna, to prevent evictions and ensure fair tenancy procedures, the Centre for Secure Housing (Fachstelle für Wohnungssicherung – FAWOS) was established in 1996 to provide rapid, efficient help to persons facing eviction. It is an agency of the Department of Social Affairs, Social and Health Law of the city of Vienna.

Authors:

Gleis 21 – We bring the village to the city

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Gleis 21 – We bring the village to the city

Urban Design

Main objectives of the project

Date

  • 2021: Construcción

Stakeholders

  • Arquitecto: einszueins architektur
  • Arquitecto:  YEWO LANDSCAPES GmbH
  • Constructor: Weissenseer Holz-System-Bau GmbH 

Location

City: Vienna
Country/Region: Austria, Vienna

Description

Under the motto “Setting the course together”, the co-housing project Gleis 21 was planned in a participatory manner with the future residents, from urban development to the socket outlet. The property is located in the center of the new urban development area “Leben am Helmut Zilk Park” near the Vienna Central Station („Hauptbahnhof Wien“). The project and the cultural association of the same name want to contribute to the development of the district. Communication within and outward, is key at Gleis 21. The co-housing project Gleis 21 builds on three major principles: “living in solidarity”, “indulging cleverly”, and “creating with media”. Solidarity is lived in a variety of ways, be it simple neighborhood services or a Solidarityfund for personal emergencies. Lived solidarity also includes certain appartements, that were planned in cooperation with Diakonie Flüchtlingsdienst (a refugee aid organization), that can be given to refugees. To help shape the cultural, social and media life in the newly developed quarter, a cooperation with Radio Orange, Okto TV and Stadkino Wien (cinema) was formed. The cultural Organization Gleis 21 is going to ensure a steady cultural program adapted to and in unison with its surroundings. A music-school on the lower floor rounds out the cultural scope of opportunity. Extensive communal areas represent the focus of the communal aspect and offer space for common and individual use: from the communal kitchen to the library and sauna on the top floor to the workshop, studio and fitness room in the basement. The selection and details of community-spaces were made by the residents and form the center of communal aspects of the project. The project was designed as a compact, zero-energy house („Niedrigstenergiehaus“) in a wood-hybrid construction and was built in a resources saving way. The individually planned housing-units on the upper four floors are accessed via an open north-west-facing arcade and are all equipped with private balconies. The neutral and flexible structure of the building enabled each unit to be planned individually in collaboration with its residents

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Performative Brise- Soleil

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Performative Brise- Soleil

Urban Design Services and infrastructure Liveability

Main objectives of the project

The Performative Brise-Soleil transforms a challenging housing location into a space of abundance. It is part of an urban neighborhood offering affordable housing, social amenities, and commercial spaces. The vertical organization within the building allows for diverse flat types, including cluster-living and housing cooperatives. The Performative Brise-Soleil, a vertical "garden-shelf," creates a three-dimensional sphere of free space while serving as a noise shield. It acts as a parametric sculpture along the highway, deflecting noise and providing access to the apartments. The concrete structure reflects the building's inner complexity and incorporates open and closed surfaces. The use of climbing plants adds a layer of greenery to the building over time.

Date

  • 2018: Construcción

Stakeholders

  • Arquitecto: StudioVlayStreeruwitz ZT-GMBH

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Vienna
Country/Region: Austria, Vienna

Description

Translating constraints into spatial abundancy: Vertical free space for subsidized housing The architectural invention of the Performative Brise-Soleil turns an “impossible” housing location into exciting spatial opportunities, undermining the scarce realm of subsidized housing with abundant free spaces. The project is part of a new urban neighbourhood offering affordable housing (about 600 rental apartments) with additional social, educational and commercial uses in the ground floor. The bar-type (156 apts) forms the neighbourhood’s western edge, shielding off the highway-noise from the inner-area. Its ground floor provides a kindergarten, a workshop for handicapped people, a communal gym-space, and an office for caretakers of homeless people. The complex vertical organisation within the bar allows for the stacking of diverse flat types, enabling a wide range of living-models, including cluster-living and housing cooperatives. The complexity’s common denominator is the Performative Brise-Soleil: a vertical “garden-shelf”, whose significant concrete structure converts the protective idea of a noise-shield into a 3-dimensional sphere of experiencing free space. The Performative Brise-Soleil is a design-coup, which converts the defensive obligation of noise-protection into an inviting cosmos of co-living: the combination of type-mutation (vertical differentiation), landscape-infiltration, and living diversity transforms the noise-shield-bar into a socially sustainable and spatially generous vertical neighbourhood. Along the highway the Brise-Soleil represents itself as a parametric sculpture meticulously designed for orchestrating the proximity between highway and living. On the lower levels, a specific configuration of patios and balconies deflects the noise. Above, open access corridors, accompanied by sliding glass elements and storage boxes, offer both access and free space to the apartments, via bridges, framing single atriums above the “commons”, a generous neighbourhood-terrace on 5th floor. The Brise-Soleil reflects the curved building’s inner complexity: a stacking of different flat-types and landscapes, provoking synergies for a mixed housing program, which, aside from usual living models, involves housing-cooperatives, cluster-living, and special forms of generation-living. Construction and materiality emphasize the vertical diversity of flat-types. The concrete structure is used to extrapolate vertical diversity: the bar type’s depth alternates between 13 and 23m. Spatially, structurally and physically, the face of the Performative Brise-Soleil is the most significant element, hiding and expressing the building’s inner complexity at the same time. Its texture of open and closed surfaces consists of concrete as the main ingredient, reflecting the concept of adding value to a realm of scarcity. The concrete’s surfaces alternate between rough/raw, as created by the nonchalance of the construction-team, and elegant/noble, provided by a prefabricated relief of irregular vertical lines. Single glazing is discretely inserted for noise protection where necessary. Along the common terrace runs a plant-trough made of galvanized steel that accentuates the gentle curve of the building. From this trough, climbing plants grow along vertical cables, continuing the personalized greenery from the lower balconies and patios, which in time will cover the building with a layer of leaves, adding a secondary materiality.

Authors:

Lohbach Residences

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Lohbach Residences

Urban Design

Main objectives of the project

This housing development, located in Innsbruck, features six buildings with five to seven storeys, offering a total of 298 apartments. The car-free zones, designed by artists, serve as playgrounds and are accessible via paved paths. The apartments have French windows leading to balconies, providing ample free spaces accessible from every room. Copper shutters and satinated glass parapets offer sun protection, weather resistance, and privacy. The development includes a supervised home for the elderly and apartments equipped for elderly or disabled individuals. Sustainability, ecological standards, comfort, and low operational costs are prioritized in this new part of Innsbruck. The compact buildings with varying heights optimize space and offer views of the surrounding landscape. The use of shutters on the balconies allows for a flexible balance between private and public life. The planning process emphasizes software over hardware, resulting in cost savings without compromising quality. The staircases and surface materials maintain a high standard uncommon in social housing projects.

Date

  • 2000: Construcción

Stakeholders

  • Arquitecto: Baumschlager Eberle / be St Gallen

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Innsbruck
Country/Region: Austria

Description

This housing development is located at the west end of the Franz-Baumann-Weg and forms the border between the residential and agricultural zones in the western part of Innsbruck. The 298 apartments of the complex are spread out over six buildings with five to seven storeys, accessed via a system of paved paths and areas. Designed by artists, these zones are car free and also utilised by children as playgrounds. A covered entrance area leads to the large stairways lit from overhead from which the units are accessed. All openings to the outside are French windows providing access to the balconies that run around the buildings. As a result, each apartment disposes of generous free spaces accessible from every room. Shutters made of copper and parapets of satinated glass serve as a protection from sun and weather and provide privacy. There is a supervised daily home for elderly people in one of the buildings and apartments with special equipment for elderly or handicapped persons. All houses have direct access to the underground car park. 735 5884 735 5885 This new part of Innsbruck is characterised by sustainability, high ecological standards, comfort for the inhabitants and minimal operational costs. The energy savings for space heating and domestic hot water heating amount to approximately 70 per cent compared to conventional dwellings of the same size. The placement of these six extremely compact buildings with different height levels permits that the spaces between have been omptimised while providing for a high density. These spaces offer interesting views of the surrounding landscape and the use of the shutters on the balconies mediates the relationship between private and public life allowing for continual change and in accordance with the inhabitants needs. The aim to use more software and less hardware in the whole planning process has been achieved without compromising on quality. Cost savings for the inhabitants have been achieved on invisible parts and both the generously dimensioned staircases with stone floors and the high standard of surface materials are not often found in social housing projects.

Authors:

Europan – Innsbruck Olympic Village

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Europan – Innsbruck Olympic Village

Mismatches
Urban Design

Main objectives of the project

Date

  • 2006: Construcción

Stakeholders

  • Arquitecto: Frötscher Lichtenwagner Architekten

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Innsbruck
Country/Region: Austria, Innsbruck

Description

This project is a multifunctional city within a city, catering to people of all ages. It includes social housing, assisted living apartments, a day-care centre, a youth club, a multifunctional hall, and a supermarket. It serves as a village within a village, connecting the surrounding Olympic Villages and providing a collective new center. The design showcases both meticulous urban planning and individual attention to detail. It fosters a sense of community, with teenagers gathering at the square and elderly individuals finding a supportive living environment. This mixed-use project successfully accommodates diverse populations, aligning with Europan's goal of promoting inclusivity. This project is a small city built for people of all age groups, with a complete repertoire of different functions. It includes at the same time social housing for families, assisted living apartments, a day-care centre, a youth club, a multifunctional hall, a supermarket. It is a village in a village in a city… The project is both urban design and architecture, and it shows both an enormous control on the large scale and individual care and creativity on the level of its parts. It stands self-consciously in the middle of the two Olympic Villages, linking them, giving them a collective new centre, both formally and programmatically. Teenagers use the square as a place to hang out, elderly people have found a place where the can live on their own with help when needed. Thus, the capacity of the quarter to house all kinds of different people, one of the main reasons why Europan promotes mixed-use projects, has been increased.

Authors:

Europan – Wien, Austria

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Europan – Wien, Austria

Mismatches
Policies and regulations
Urban Design
Promotion and production

Main objectives of the project

Date

  • 2022: Construcción

Stakeholders

  • Arquitecto: Arenas Basabe Palacios arquitectos

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Vienna
Country/Region: Austria, Vienna

Description

Arenas Basabe Palacios was runner-up with their project Urban Software to E12 competition. Their project proposed a strategy prioritising the process over the final result, based on the generation of a flexible support able to react to the various scales and context conditions. This award allowed them to take part in the design of the Siemensäcker urban planning for a new 8 hectares residential neighbourhood in the north of Vienna. This urban project was developed through a collaborative process with a dozen or so offices of experts in urbanism, architecture, landscape, mobility, energy,etc. Once the masterplan was passed in December 2016, the owner of the land (Austrian Real State) commissioned us with the design of 65 housing units, distributed in three blocks of different dimensions (sizes S, M, L). The project takes advantage of the different building scales and free spaces foreseen in the planning to connect itself to the diverse urban fabrics that surround it and to adapt to the topography and landscape. The scale of the buildings is attenuated thanks to the volumes that project outwards from the façade, which also stablish specific relationships with the surrounding elements, spaces and axes. In parallel to the design of the architecture, we are still involved in the ‘Qualitätenkatalog’- the group of experts that collectively define the qualities of the free space, the landscape, the common parking space and the management of the non-residential uses of the neighbourhood. In this manner, individual decisions are made based on collective work, and vice versa: it is thus a design process that unifies the disciplines of the architecture and urbanism, establishing guidelines at building and neighbourhood scales simultaneously. Each housing unit is organized around a nucleus of furniture, which integrates within every storage, installation and serving unit. Thanks to this, all living spaces are connected to the exterior, reserving for the ‘day area’ (kitchen-sitting room-dinning room) the area wich will enjoy, due to its two orientations, the most daylight hours.

Authors:

Wien, Austria

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Wien, Austria_1

Wien, Austria

Mismatches
Policies and regulations
Urban Design
Promotion and production

Main objectives of the project

Date

  • 2012: Construcción

Stakeholders

  • Arquitecto: ex Studio uek
  • Arquitecto: ARGEbKöb&Pollak + Alexander Schmoeger
  • Arquitecto: goya ZT

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Vienna
Country/Region: Austria, Vienna

Description

After the competition, the team engaged in discussions with various stakeholders, including Wien Holding, GESIBA (the housing cooperative), the district head, and the Europan secretary. They refined their ideas and concepts and considered rezoning the area but ultimately decided to make slight adjustments to the urban plan instead. The project was approved to be realized under the Wienese Subsidised Housing framework, leading to the division of the site into three parts and the initiation of another competition called Bauträgerwettbewerb. Studio uek was invited to build one part of the project and contribute to the competition brief. Additional experts were involved to address landscape architecture and participation, resulting in rules and regulations that complemented the existing zoning. The project focused on urban porosity and connecting the housing project with the surrounding area. Two other teams were selected to build the remaining parts, each with their own housing concepts. Studio uek constructed 171 housing units, including sheltered housing and a geriatric day center, and incorporated common spaces and a roof-top route that connects the three parts. The participative activation process allowed residents to define programs for smaller communal spaces and participate in the management of rooftop flowerbeds and gardens. Just after the competition, the team entered in a discussion phase with several actors included Wien Holding, the head of the housing cooperative GESIBA, the head of the district and Europan secretary. They had to sharpen their ideas and their concepts. It was also discussed whether the team should consider rezoning the area but then they decided that through a slight translation of the urban plan without really losing a lot of the qualities, they could avoid this time consuming process. At the end of this first phase it was decided that the project should be realized within the framework of the Wienese Subsidised Housing, which meant that the site should be divided into three smaller parts and thar another competition called Bauträgerwettbewerb should take a place. The team was invited both to build one part of this project and to contribute to elaborate the competition brief. In order to pursue their idea from Europan competition, the team involved additional experts for landscape architecture and for participation and all together they formulated additional rules and regulations for this competition brief, which should complement the existing zoning. These rules concerned the configutation of the whole project, but also the character of the garden courtyard, the rooftop route, several main common spaces in each project part and thar should be included in each project a participative activation process. Studio uek worked on this specific element of urban porosity, on connecting points between the outside road, the surroundings and the inside world of the housing project. Two Austrian teams were selected to build the two other parts of the area. The first one (ARGE Köb&Pollak / Alexander Schmoeger) on the North side worked on experimental housing providing apartments from a very small size like 30m2 up to big shared apartments. The second team (goya ZT GmbH), in the South part, focused on young and urban housing with a lot of sports and leisure facilities inside the housing project. Studio uek built 171 housing (of which 30 are sheltered housing) + a geriatric day centre. The three built parts have some common spaces dedicated, for some of them, to support the small community of the building and for some other, to offer possibilities to inhabitants of the whole project (like the “play and celebration space” in the studio uek part). A roof-top-route links the three built parts offering also collective spaces (like tenants flowerbeds, glass house, summer kitchen…) The participative activation process allowed inhabitants to define the programs for smaller common spaces and they were also involved in the management of the flowebeds / garden on the roof.

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Soft urban renewal in Vienna, Austria

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Soft urban renewal in Vienna, Austria

Mismatches
Policies and regulations
Urban Design
Promotion and production

Main objectives of the project

Date

  • 2010: Rehabilitación

Stakeholders

  • Promotor: Vienna Housing Rehabilitation

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Vienna
Country/Region: Austria, Vienna

Description

Soft urban renewal, implemented under the 1984 Vienna Housing Rehabilitation Act, is a non-disruptive approach that avoids demolishing historic buildings or displacing residents. It focuses on financial incentives for private homeowners and follows a decentralized and participatory method for building and neighborhood improvements. The emphasis is on improving housing standards without causing social segregation or gentrification. The scheme has successfully reduced substandard housing from 320,000 to less than 125,000 units through rehabilitation efforts. It has created affordable rehabilitated housing without changing ownership, resulting in over 715,000 fully equipped apartments. The approach prioritizes affordability, social inclusion, and the needs of vulnerable households. Redevelopment is managed by district offices, supported by private architects or non-profit building associations and funded by the city. These offices collaborate with tenants and owners to enhance housing stock, including green courtyards and communal facilities, while promoting connections to public transport. There are currently 13 district offices that actively involve vulnerable and socially marginalized households with the support of city funds. It is considered “soft” or ”gentle” as it does not involve the demolition of historic buildings or the construction of entirely new urban areas, nor does it displace and compulsorily rehouse residents living in renewal areas. Legislated under the 1984 Vienna Housing Rehabilitation Act, the soft urban renewal created financial renovation incentives for private homeowners and was implemented through a decentralized and participatory approach to building and neighbourhood improvement. Much effort has since gone towards improving housing standards, while avoiding social segregation and gentrification. The urban renewal has involved strategic subsidization of private housing rehabilitation, rather than the demolition of historic buildings. Public authorities first look at bringing empty flats into use and developing communal areas and then later address whole blocks of flats and creating new urban areas.[3] An evaluation of this scheme in 2010 found that soft renewal had made substantial improvements to living conditions in Vienna. From 1984 to 2001, through rehabilitation, houses that were categorised as substandard were substantially reduced – from approximately 320,000 (39 per cent of the total stock) to less than 125,000. The renewal activities produced a large stock of affordable rehabilitated housing with avoiding a forced change of ownership or occupancy. One important result was the avoidance of social segregation and gentrification. A total of 2,160 buildings with 142,000 apartments were improved as part of the process of soft renewal and the number of fully equipped apartments rose from about 328,000 to more than 715,000.[1] Notably, limited profit affordable housing is in relatively good condition, in part due to the business model which funds it that requires regular maintenance and periodic renovation. Chapter II on funding and financing affordable and inclusive housing has extensively elaborated on this matter. The soft renewal approach, which is both decentralized and interdisciplinary, prioritises affordability and social inclusion objectives, avoids forced change of ownership and enables rehabilitated housing to remain affordable to existing occupants. Particular attention is given to the needs of vulnerable households (the elderly and new migrants). The redevelopment is managed by offices in each city district. These are run by either private architects or non-profit building associations and are financed by the city. They work with both tenants and owners to improve the housing stock; for example, by enhancing green courtyards, and making proposals for communal facilities and connections to public transport. There are now 13 district offices (Gebietsbetreuungen) which can also apply for city funds to involve vulnerable or socially marginalised households more actively.

Authors: