Caserne de Reuilly

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Caserne de Reuilly

Mismatches Services Diversity
Urban Design Environments Liveability
Promotion and production Public promotion
Ownership and tenure

Main objectives of the project

The Caserne de Reuilly stands as a flagship urban renewal endeavor aimed at providing accessible housing solutions in the heart of Paris. As an integral component of the city's sustainable development strategy, this initiative marks a significant shift in repurposing former military infrastructure for social good. Under the joint efforts of the public housing entity Paris Habitat, municipal authorities, the State, and local stakeholders, the barracks underwent a comprehensive revitalization process, prioritizing circularity principles while preserving its historical significance. Amidst the backdrop of Paris' dense urban landscape, the transformation of Reuilly has not only addressed the shortage of affordable housing but also cultivated a diverse and inclusive community. Now encompassing a mix of affordable residences, student accommodations, childcare facilities, green spaces, and commercial establishments, the area has been transformed from a vacant lot into a thriving neighborhood, embodying the city's commitment to sustainable urban development.

Date

  • 2019: Construction

Stakeholders

  • Promotor: Paris Habitat
  • Architect: NP2F
  • Architect: Lin Architects Urbanists
  • Architect: Mir Architectes
  • Architect: Charles-Henri Tachon
  • Architect: LACROIX CHESSEX

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Paris
Country/Region: France, Paris

Description

The history of the Caserne de Reuilly dates back to the 17th century, but by the early 21st century, the barracks were in dire need of refurbishment. Consequently, the city of Paris acquired the land from the Defense Ministry with the aim of rejuvenating the area. Collaborating with Paris Habitat, the site underwent a transformation into a new neighborhood featuring social housing, university residences, and commercial zones. The overarching goal was to preserve the historical character while introducing new spaces, fostering a diverse and mixed-use community. In total, the development comprises 582 housing units.

Paris Habitat demonstrated pioneering efforts by integrating the reuse of materials into the project. For instance, lighting fixtures, slates, and paving stones from the barracks were repurposed on-site. In addition to refurbishing the old barracks, new buildings were erected, such as those along Diderot Boulevard, which harmoniously blend with the existing architecture. These buildings incorporate 79 dwellings, a childcare facility, a public parking lot, and commercial spaces. The architectural design responds directly to the surrounding context while embracing contemporary elements, contributing to the coherence of the neighborhood. Addressing the space between the fire station, Reuilly barracks, and the new construction was a key challenge. The proposed structure aims to reconcile various geometries, resulting in a complex yet cohesive architectural form characterized by terraces and indentations. The inclusion of a square between the buildings encourages social interaction, while the lower volume's roof serves as a playground for the childcare facility, fostering a vibrant community atmosphere.

Similarly, the residential building known as plot B1, comprising 22 housing units, serves as an entry point to the barracks complex. Its colorful façade distinguishes it from the rest of the development while maintaining overall harmony, serving as a visible and inviting gateway to the barracks.

In essence, the new complex exemplifies how to create affordable housing while preserving public ownership, employing high-quality architecture, and embracing a variety of housing typologies to nurture a diverse and inclusive community.

Le Chaperon-Vert (Îlot 5)

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Le Chaperon-Vert (Îlot 5)

Mismatches Functional adequacy Climate change
Urban Design Environments Liveability
Promotion and production Public promotion
Ownership and tenure Protection of social housing

Main objectives of the project

Constructed in the 1950s on land previously occupied by market gardens and a shanty town, Chaperon-Vert briefly claimed the title of the largest low-cost housing estate (HLM) in Île-de-France. Over fifty years later, the district initiated an urban renewal project (ORU) under the auspices of the National Agency for Urban Renovation (ANRU). The decade-long renovation endeavor for Le Chaperon-Vert culminated with the refurbishment of the final block, Building Number 5, encompassing six buildings and a total of 264 housing units.

Date

  • 2019: Construction

Stakeholders

  • Architect: L’agence RVA
  • Architect: Jacques Poirier
  • Promotor: National Agency for Urban Renovation (ANRU)

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Paris
Country/Region: France, Paris

Description

The overarching objective of the renovation project was to enhance the comfort, design, and energy efficiency of the buildings, within the context of a 1960s structure in urgent need of attention. Like many similar housing estates of its time, Chaperon-Vert faced challenges such as space constraints due to surrounding roads and parking lots, leading to significant noise and air pollution as well as a lack of communal green areas. Social issues and energy inefficiency were pressing concerns necessitating urban and housing interventions. "Îlot 5," comprising six buildings, marked the culmination of this ambitious endeavor on the Arcueil side. The architects aimed to preserve and amplify the urban coherence of the complex by restoring its classic modern extrados through the enhancement of concrete structures and brick infills. They also sought to establish a local public park to reflect the scale of the residence and address contemporary housing quality standards through light extensions around the garden that harmonized with the existing rhythm.

The intervention involved several key aspects. Initially, restoration efforts focused on the metal shutters and other facade elements, while balconies were replaced with perforated metal to afford greater privacy, matching the color scheme of the extensions. Additionally, interior facades received a light sand-colored aluminum envelope, and a prefabricated reinforced concrete system was installed with brick panel infills. Notably, approximately 1,000 square meters of living space were added by thickening the walls.

Five previously marginalized squares within the district underwent complete redevelopment to improve access to the block's core, foster biodiversity, and introduce new exchange spaces, transforming former parking-dominated areas into vibrant green public spaces. Tenant consultations were conducted to co-design the future of Chaperon-Vert and indoor housing conditions. Energy efficiency was significantly improved, with all homes now achieving a label C energy performance rating (annual consumption less than 150 kWh/square meters) through equipment upgrades and facade enhancements.

The outcome of the intervention is evident in the transformation of 264 dwellings into 249, with 157 renovated or restructured and 92 extended. At the heart of the revitalized enclave lies a landscaped square featuring play and relaxation areas alongside fruit trees.

This final intervention seamlessly aligns with the overarching renovation project, with seven distinct work sites established, each reflecting its unique identity. While red brick remains prominent on the street-facing side (albeit cleaned facades), various facades within the blocks retain their distinct characteristics. Notably, Building Number 5 stands out with its glossy golden metal finish.

Prêt à impact- the Social and Environmental Impact Loan

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Prêt à impact- the Social and Environmental Impact Loan

Mismatches Financing
Financing Financial actors Sustainable development financing Public-private collaboration

Main objectives of the project

Caisse d'Epargne has introduced the Social and Environmental Impact Loan (Prêt à impact) to bolster the engagement of its real estate and social housing clientele in social and environmental causes. In this initiative, the interest rates of each loan will be linked to the non-financial social or environmental performance of the borrowers, with the potential bonus being directed towards supporting charitable associations.

Date

  • 2020: En proceso

Stakeholders

  • Caisse d'Epargne

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Paris
Country/Region: France, Paris

Description

Caisse d'Epargne, a longstanding private bank in France renowned for its investments in social housing and public sector ventures, aimed to incentivize its clients to adopt more ambitious social and environmental standards in their social housing endeavors. Drawing on these principles of the institution, the initiative introduces an incentive mechanism where social landlords can benefit from an interest rate indexed to their non-financial performance for each loan.

The bank's endorsement extends to both social and environmental criteria, encompassing social inclusion, disability support, aging population care, urban diversity, occupant health, energy efficiency, greenhouse gas emissions reduction, environmentally responsible practices, and sustainable mobility. Performance in each area is assessed through specific indicators. Should the client meet the predefined objectives annually throughout the loan term, they enjoy a rate increase, which they may choose to contribute to a charitable cause. In cases where objectives are not met, the contractual rate applies without penalty. Through this scheme, Caisse d'Epargne aims to recognize and encourage its clients' efforts in reducing their environmental impact and supporting societal causes, fostering more sustainable and responsible project developments.

It is worth noting that Impact Loans are available not only to social housing providers but also to real estate enterprises, with distinct criteria applied. Real estate entities focus on providing healthy and diverse housing options, while social housing emphasizes inclusion. In both cases, affordable housing schemes are fostered.

The inaugural Impact Loan was initiated by Caisse d'Epargne Ile-de-France in partnership with the Regie Immobiliere of the City of Paris, the second-largest social housing provider in Paris. This 25 million euro loan will cater to the needs of the social landlord, enabling it to secure an interest rate increase of 15 basis points by dedicating at least 20% of annually allocated dwellings to a priority population, as per French law. Both parties have agreed to allocate 50% of the bonus amount annually to a social housing foundation.

This scheme is hailed as highly innovative in Europe, notably for integrating non-financial performance into its mechanism. Similar initiatives exist in the Netherlands. Amidst the COVID-19 recovery phase, this French scheme facilitates social housing investment programs under optimal conditions while fostering a profound social commitment.

La résidence Gergovie- Rehabilitation to tackle energy inefficiency and social housing

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La résidence Gergovie- Rehabilitation to tackle energy inefficiency and social housing

Mismatches Functional adequacy Diversity Climate change
Urban Design Quality Liveability Participatory processes
Ownership and tenure Protection of social housing

Main objectives of the project

The project concerns the rehabilitation of a building of 299 social housing units, built in 1962. ICF Habitat bought this apartment block in January 2013 in the framework of an acquisition-improvement and this operation will be its first major renovation. The program focuses on improving energy efficiency, restructuring the outdoor, enhancing the building’s comfort and aestheticism. By improving the thermal performance without increasing the rent, ICH Habitat La Sablière tackles its tenants’ energy precariousness.

Date

  • 2019: Construction

Stakeholders

  • Constructor: ICF Habitat La Sablière
  • Architect: A&B ARCHITECTES

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Paris
Country/Region: France, Paris

Description

ICF Housing is the housing subsidiary of SNCF (the train company in France). Born to provide housing to SNCF employees, now ICF Housing is one of the largest housing operators in France. Despite not being just a social housing operator, his aim is to develop diversified housing solutions, with affordable housing at the center of their policies. 84% of their managed housing is social housing. In 2013, they bought an old building in Gergovie street, in the 14th District of Paris.

The building aimed to be rehabilitated, together with the nearby urban space. Yet, the main goal was to achieve a energy efficient building. This was structured in three main objectives: Setting a modernized heating system, performing an insulation work on the building and coupling microgeneration with heat pumps and the use of waste energy. In fact, The collective hot water production system developed by ICF Habitat and its partners won an award at the Trophées Européen de l'Habitat Responsable in the "environmental sustainability" category. The system cuts the cost of domestic hot water production by a factor of 2, while maintaining an affordable level of rental charges. It combines economic and social performance (combating fuel poverty) with environmental performance (introducing 50% renewable energy and dividing energy consumption and CO2 emissions by 2). The system comprises two gas microgenerations coupled with four modular heat pumps designed to recover waste energy (the fumes from boilers dedicated to central heating) and cover the residence's domestic hot water needs. Operation is based on a synergy of exchanges, enabling heat gains at every stage. The cogeneration units are controlled and managed by modular heat pumps developed specifically for this coupled application. Thai changes made the building a front-runner case for the Plan Climat of Paris.

Apart from the climatic action, the project has developed other rehabilitation actions, such as the refurbishment of common areas, the creation of new bicycle/stroller and waste sorting areas, the creation of a new reception desk, the revegetation of entrances and roof, a complete overdo of outdoor areas, including a space for a shared garden, the residentialisation with access control, new intercom system and secure main entrances… Moreover, 5 apartments for people with reduced mobility were created on the first floor, with restructuring of the former entrance halls

Consultation with tenants was key to the project and led to a shared diagnosis and a program of works in line with their expectations. Through interviews at the foot of the buildings and workshops, residents expressed their wishes for the development and evolution of their living environment: dedicated areas (strollers, bicycles), household waste management, green space development, pathways, building approaches, parking organization, relationship with the square, etc. A vote enabled everyone to express their opinion on the choice of the exterior development project. Carrying out a project of this type in an occupied environment presented a certain complexity and many inconveniences. This project was made possible thanks to the strong involvement of the tenants' association, the support of local authorities and public authorities, and the professionalism and innovative spirit of our teams.

The housing units increases the capacity to offer social housing to SNCF employees. This takes on particular importance following the launch of the “housing guarantee” policy, a scheme offering newly recruited railway workers in the Île-de-France region housing at a rent commensurate with their salary level.

Experimental Public Housing

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Experimental Public Housing

Policies and regulations
Financing
Urban Design
Ownership and tenure

Main objectives of the project

Our time strives for the environmental quality of buildings and their energy frugality. In a social perspective of housing history, such collective pleas have lead to creating housing schemes, garden cities and even Bastides. In our turn, aware of this issue, which architectural expression will our generation convey?

Date

  • 2013: Rehabilitación

Stakeholders

  • Architect: Marc Reynaud
  • Architect: Armand Nouvet
  • Architect: Thibaud Babled

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Paris
Country/Region: France

Description

This small experimental building was an opportunity to look into sustainable construction. Very low energy consumption goals are achieved exclusively through architectural means. That is, without relying on technological accessories, but using definitely low-tech displays and devices (orientation, windows, piers, verandas, curtains) and involving inhabitants gestures and use of their home. Therefore the façade geometry is ever changing, animated by use, weather and glass reflexions. The global architectural design proposes some evidence: it favours a straight expression of its construction.
The project is part of the urban redevelopment of the Frequel-
Fontarabie block in North-East Paris. It was to become a pilot operation for the newly voted Plan Climat de la Ville de Paris, which asked for a maximum energy expenditure of 50 kWh/m2/year. To meet this target, the architectural team decided to rely solely on architecture on a site that, although very dense, offered to take advantage of sun.
The new volumes are adjusted to the end walls of the next buildings to reduce shadows. They draw a ribbon garden shared by residents and opening onto the new public garden, constructions getting lower as you penetrate the block.
The three entrance-halls open directly onto this courtyard. Each one is open to all residents: respectively giving access to the underground garage, the letterboxes or the bike storage room.
The bearing structure is minimized to a post-slab system using less concrete, offering more flexibility in flat layouts and enabling future conversion of the building. The resulting colonnade, allows the sunlight deep into the flats.
Limited use of concrete on facades favours a larger use of renewable materials. Custom-made wood framed sliding windows give a very precise quality to both exterior and interiors.
Apartments are designed so as to maximise natural light and ventilation, most bathrooms opening onto a window. Inhabitants are given greater control over temperatures in any season.
The double envelop sets an acoustic and bioclimatic device reinforced by Trombe walls. Sunlight penetrates the first extra-clear glass envelope and hits the wavy wall, whose dark matt surface turns light into heat. To stop this natural heating, inhabitants simply roll down the blind facing the wall and open the exterior windows.
Size of the site :944 m2
Size of the building :1960 m2 (GFA)

Transformation of Tour Bois-le-Prêtre Housing Block

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Transformation of Tour Bois-le-Prêtre Housing Block

Urban Design Services and infrastructure Quality Inclusion

Main objectives of the project

This 16-storey high-rise block in Paris was transformed instead of being demolished. New flooring was added to each level, creating closable terraces for winter gardens and balconies. The apartments were improved with more natural light and energy efficiency. The small windows were replaced with large openings for panoramic views. The entrance hall was refurbished, removing unnecessary rooms and making it open and transparent. Collective activity areas and lifts were added, and prefabricated construction allowed residents to stay during renovations.

Date

  • 2011: Rehabilitación

Stakeholders

  • Architect: Lacaton & Vassal architectes
  • Architect: Frédéric Druot Architecture; 

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Paris
Country/Region: France, Paris

Description

Built in the early 60s along the ring road on the northern periphery of Paris, this high-rise block of 16 storeys contains 96 apartments. Instead of demolition, which was the first option that was considered, a project of transformation of the existing building was decided upon.The project proposed a generous expansion of the apartments. On each level, new flooring, which was built as a self-supporting structure, was added onto the entire periphery of the tower. This design strategy allowed for the extension of all the rooms by creating closable terraces that could act as winter gardens as well as balconies for each unit.

At the same time the overall quality and comfort of the apartments was improved with additional natural light and the reduction of energy consumption for heating. The existing facades with their small windows were removed and they were replaced by large transparent openings so that the residents can enjoy the exceptional panoramic views over Paris. The entrance hall on the ground floor was refurbished and it was made level with the exterior. All the useless rooms and installations were removed in order to make the entryway an open and transparent space through which the new garden can be accessed. On the sides of this space, areas for collective activities were established and two lifts were installed to improve the vertical circulation to the apartments. The construction was carried out with prefabricated elements so that the inhabitants could remain in the apartments during the renovation of the building.

Authors:

Boileau Apartments, Transformation of an Office Block into Housing

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Boileau Apartments, Transformation of an Office Block into Housing

Main objectives of the project

Date

  • 1995: Construction

Stakeholders

  • Architect: Ateliers Lion Associés Architectes Urbanistes

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Paris
Country/Region: France, Paris

Description

Authors:

Social Housing rue des Lyanes

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Social Housing rue des Lyanes

Main objectives of the project

Date

  • 1997: Construction

Stakeholders

  • Architect: Odile Seyler

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Paris
Country/Region: France, Paris

Description

Authors:

Housing on Boulevard de Belleville

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Housing on Boulevard de Belleville

Urban Design

Main objectives of the project

Date

  • 1989: Construction

Stakeholders

  • Architect: Frederic Borel Architect

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Paris
Country/Region: France, Paris

Description

Rue de Meaux Housing Complex

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Rue de Meaux Housing Complex

Main objectives of the project

This building is situated in a densely populated area of Paris. Its rectangular shape integrates with the surrounding urban fabric, but its center features a carved-out interior green space. The building is divided into three sections by narrow slots, with the garden creating a surprising contrast to the bustling street. Residents access their building entrance by walking through the garden, adding to the element of surprise. The building offers a variety of apartment sizes and layouts, with model apartments designed to be flexible and neutral. Each of the 220 apartments has two exposures, overlooking both the garden and the urban neighborhood.

Date

  • 1991: Construction

Stakeholders

  • Architect: Renzo Piano Building Workshop

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Paris
Country/Region: France, Paris

Description

The building is located in a densely populated area of the 19th arrondisement in Paris. The building, with a rectangle general shape, can be thought of as a mass built to fit into the existing urban fabric on its outside perimeter while its center has been "carved out" to accommodate an interior green space. Two narrow slots divide the constructions in there sections on the garden. The contrast between the bustle of the street and the calm of the garden creates hence, an effect of surprise for the residents who must walk through the garden to reach their building entrance. The volumetric diversity of the building results in a wide variety of apartments. However, for the buildings bordering the garden and for the blocks on the east and west separated by the slots, model apartments with fairly neutral and flexible layouts were created.

Essentially they comprise a large crosswise room facing north-south with a balcony or winter garden at either end; a conventional “night” area is adjacent. Therefore each apartment of the 220 created, has two exposures: the garden and the urban neighbourhood.

Authors: