Cireres

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Cireres

Mismatches Financing Functional adequacy Services Cultural suitability Diversity Climate change
Policies and regulations Local policies Land Public-private initiatives
Financing Financial actors
Urban Design Environments Quality Liveability
Promotion and production Public-private partnerships Participatory processes Self-management Self-promotion Cooperatives
Ownership and tenure Shared ownership Protection of social housing Land ownership

Main objectives of the project

Cireres is a housing project whose goal is to build a cooperative housing that avoids speculation and the market dynamics. Thanks to a leasing of public land, a group of people in search of affordable housing could form a community with sustainable and top-tier housing units.

Date

  • 2022: Ganador
  • 2022: Construction
  • 2017: En proceso

Stakeholders

  • Promotor: SostreCivic (Coopertaiva Cireres)
  • Promotor: Barcelona City Hall
  • Constructor: La Constructiva
  • Architect: CelObert
  • Matriu
  • Col·lectiu Ronda
  • Fiare
  • Arç

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Barcelona
Country/Region: Barcelona, Spain

Description

Cireres is located in Roquetes, a popular neighborhood of Barcelona, with significant levels of vulnerability. This neighborhood has undergone considerable urban improvement since the 1990s. Originally, it was formed as a neighborhood of informal housing. Over the years, these dwellings have been integrated into the urban fabric and living conditions have improved. Today, the neighborhood faces new challenges. Mainly, housing speculation has entered fully into the daily life of the neighbors. For this reason, an investment in social housing is necessary. However, social housing is often expensive for the administration and has no roots in the neighborhood.

Cireres wants to solve the above problems. The project follows the logic of cooperative housing in lease of use. The public administration leases a municipal lot to a cooperative for a long period of time. In exchange, the cooperative builds the building and its members have the right to use the housing. In this way, the municipality does not lose public land for affordable housing. On the other hand, tenants have secure tenure and are part of a larger community integrated into the neighborhood, with the agency to build and decide on their project. To move in, each cohabitation unit has had to make an initial returnable capital contribution and then monthly payments, including services and utilities, which are below city rents.

Cireres also goes a step further. The objective is to generate a community that can build the entire project and live thereafter from the social and solidarity economy, not linked to the speculative market. Thus, the financing comes from Fiare, an ethical bank. The insurance company, the construction company, the management company... and all the agents involved are non-profit cooperatives. In this way, the value of use is put in front of the value of exchange, demonstrating another way to build affordable housing. In addition, the project includes a social economat, a working cooperative of residents dedicated to the trade of agro-ecological products.

The community life of Cireres is structured in an assembly, linked to the realities of the neighborhood and the residents. Its 32 dwellings are organized around common spaces. Thus, the idea is to be a single house, erasing the distance between the public and the private, integrating community life in the residence. For example, the houses are structured around a landing where neighbors can go out to hang the laundry, play... There are also communal indoor spaces. The communal project has an ideology that everyone must respect, the framework from which the activities, complicities and constructions of relationships, group and building are developed.

The site is a plot of 428 m2 located in the street Pla dels Cirerers, 2-4, We wanted to have shared spaces of quality, which allow to release functions of the interior of the private spaces to give them to the community, so 190m2 of buildability of the site are no longer exhausted by the commitment to make community spaces. We have built reduced private living spaces (50 m2 on average), which are compensated by 771 m2 of space for community use. The material used in Cirerers is mainly wood, and also lime mortar on the facades and plasterboard in the interiors. All of them are biodegradable materials with a low ecological footprint, since their production, transport and recycling involve very low CO2 emissions.

The building has won several awards: Advanced Architecture Awards 2022 in the Sustainability category - REBUILD, European Social Innovation Competition (EUSIC) and finalist of the MINI Design Awards 2022 - Madrid Design Festival.

Authors:

La Balma

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La Balma

Mismatches Location Financing Functional adequacy Cultural suitability Diversity Vulnerable groups New family structures
Policies and regulations Local policies Land Governance Public-private initiatives Participatory processes
Financing Financial actors
Urban Design Quality Liveability
Promotion and production Public-private partnerships Participatory processes Self-management Self-promotion Cooperatives
Ownership and tenure Shared ownership Rental and temporary tenure Protection of social housing Land ownership Public-private partnerships

Main objectives of the project

La Balma is a housing cooperative on public land. Through a system of rights on land ("cesión de uso"), the municipality leases the land for a long period of time. In exchange, a cooperative of people who meet the requirements to build social housing builds their cooperative. About thirty people live in La Balma, with 20 cohabitation units.

Date

  • 2021: Construction
  • 2017: En proceso
  • 2016: Ganador

Stakeholders

  • Promotor: Sostre Civic (Coopertiva La Balma)
  • Architect: La Boqueria
  • Architect: LaCol
  • Constructor: La Constructiva SCCL
  • Constructor: Arkenova
  • Barcelona City Hall
  • Fiare Banca Ètica
  • Òmnium Cultural
  • Coop57
  • Punt de referència

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Barcelona
Country/Region: Barcelona, Spain

Description

La Balma is located in the Poblenou neighborhood of Barcelona. The neighborhood is an old industrial center of the city, which in recent years has become the first district of technological innovation in the country. It is called 22@. This project was intended to generate a technological district while maintaining the residential-industrial mix characteristic of the neighborhood. The reality has been more complex. The neighborhood has suffered a clear process of gentrification. Housing prices have skyrocketed and many of the traditional premises are no longer there. Thus, one challenge is to maintain a population involved in the neighborhood and that can afford to live in it.

It is from this logic that La Balma was born, a cooperative housing made on public land. Being part of the cooperative requires an initial contribution and the payment of monthly installments that are derived from the costs of acquisition, maintenance and operation of the cooperative housing project, and not from the situation of the real estate market. Thus, one does not acquire the land nor does one acquire the housing. Being part of the cooperative you have the right of use (or the transfer of use) for a long or lifetime period, without real estate market rises and without possible speculation. In this way, the municipality does not lose public land for affordable housing, only leases it without the cost of building social housing. On the other hand, tenants have a secure tenure and are part of a larger community integrated into the neighborhood, with the agency to build and decide on their project. To move in, each cohabitation unit has had to make an initial returnable capital contribution of between €28,000 and €38,000. The monthly payments, which include services and utilities, range from €512 to €800 per dwelling. The financing of these amounts has been made possible thanks to Fiare, an ethical and community bank.

The community at La Balma is heterogeneous and intergenerational. There are 30 people living in 20 units. We find single-parent families, couples, couples with children, cohabitant adults and individual units (from young people to retired people). Many of these people are lifelong residents of Poblenou. In fact, the community was formed prior to construction, participating in all phases of the project, from design to move-in. It also includes a pioneering social project. One of the homes is destined for two young people in exile, thanks to a joint program with Punt de Referència, an organization that works to promote the emancipation of these young people in vulnerable situations, and financed by the Libres Project (Coop57, Òmnium Cultural and ECAS). In addition, these young people participated in the entire design process of the project and participate in the democratic management of the building. To promote the interrelationship with the neighborhood, we also have a first floor space shared with associations and individuals to promote their projects. On the other hand, we are committed to ecological consumption, linking the cooperative with consumer cooperatives in the surrounding area and to self-production with vegetable gardens on the roof.

As far as the building is concerned, it has flexible and multipurpose spaces that evolve with the group according to the changes of both the living units and the people who will inhabit the building: incorporation of new members, births, growth processes of children-adolescents, aging processes of adults ... Thus, the typologies start from a basic module of 50m2 and from the annexation of living units of 16m2 (considered common space for private use in legal terms) allow to grow and shrink the houses. These units are ceded by the cooperative to the family units that need them at any given moment, therefore, it becomes a mechanism to manage changes as an alternative to rotation. This proposal is viable due to the fact that the management of the building is the responsibility of the community itself. The dwellings reduce their surface area (5-10%) to share services such as laundry, study, guest rooms or storage rooms, thus allowing that the collectivization does not involve a cost overrun, but rather the opposite, a saving and a gain in surface area and quality of life.

The architectural project has 225m2 of interior area destined to communal spaces, plus semi-exterior and exterior areas, where we find the following uses: living room - dining room, multipurpose room, library and work space, a laundry per floor, health and care space connected with auxiliary rooms, guest rooms, common and individual storage per floor, equipped deck and outdoor living area, bicycle parking, tool space and workshop area.

In 2016 the competition for the construction was won and in 2021 the building was move-in ready.

Authors:

Rent control in Catalonia

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Rent control in Catalonia

Policies and regulations National policies Local policies Governance Price control

Main objectives of the project

In 2020, Catalonia (the region of Barcelona) implemented a restrictive rent control mechanism. Defining a price index in the area, depending on the features of the unit, any owner could surpass the limit of it. By doing so, in the year the limit was set in place, the prices decrease compared to other areas without the regulation.

Date

  • 2024: Implementation
  • 2020: Implementation

Stakeholders

  • Metropolitan Government of Barcelona
  • Catalonia's Government

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Barcelona
Country/Region: Barcelona, Spain

Description

Barcelona, as a global city, faced a big challenge: housing rent. The city has a low social housing stock and private owners had a lot of power to determine the price of the rent. As a result, a speculative increase on the rent was set in place. To avoid it, the government of Catalonia implemented a rent control that became one of the most restrictive ones in Euroe

In 2020, the Catalonia Government created a price index for each area of the country. The price index was based on the features of the building and the rent currently paid in the zone (in new and old contracts). Then, all new contracts made in the zones must be lower than the index. There were fines for non-compliance, ranging from EUR 3,000 to EUR 90,000 depending on the seriousness of the offence.

After a year in motion, the policy was overruled by the constitutional court. The argument was not about the content, but about the legal power Catalonia had to do the regulation. For this reason, in 2024, Catalonia promoted a new rent control based on the legal framework of the Spanish State. In this case, the price index only affects owners of more than 5 housing units. For the rest of landlords, the limitation is that the new contract cannot be above the old one.

Although it is too early to assess the new regulation, the one in 2020 has proved to be effective. Doing a diff-in-diff analysis, the Observatory of Metropolitan Housing (the public agency responsible to assess housing policies) stated that the regulation lowered the price for tenants during the year it was enforced.

Authors:

Finques d’alta complexitat

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Finques d’alta complexitat

Mismatches Vulnerable groups Vacant housing
Policies and regulations Local policies
Financing Mortgage systems Supply subsidies Demand subsidies
Ownership and tenure Protection of social housing

Main objectives of the project

In Spain, refurbishment loans or subsidies that aim to help the most needed citizens have a high non take-up. In other words, subsidies for energetic improvements in the buildings usually end up vacant or in the hands of those who are not in most need. To tackle this issue, the Barcelona City Hall started the program “Finques d’alta complexitat” (High complexity properties, in english). The goal of the program is to have a proactive attitude of the administration and help those most deprived buildings to access to the loans or subsidies.

Date

  • 2019: Implementation

Stakeholders

  • Ajuntament de Barcelona
  • Foment de Ciutat
  • Vincle

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Barcelona
Country/Region: Barcelona, Spain

Description

During the 1960s and 1970s, Spain experienced a significant surge in social housing development. However, unlike traditional rental models, individuals who gained access to these properties became owners rather than tenants. This was facilitated by a system that allowed for the sale of affordable housing units. Over time, the protective measures on these properties, such as rent limits and restrictions on tenants, were lifted, effectively transforming occupants into unrestricted owners. Consequently, a complex issue emerged wherein low-income owners found themselves residing in deteriorating properties in dire need of renovation.

To address this challenge, Spanish authorities initiated various subsidies and public loan programs aimed at facilitating building refurbishments. However, these initiatives faced considerable challenges, particularly in disadvantaged neighborhoods and among low-income property owners. In those communities, non take-up issues emerged. Social complexities within these communities, such as squatters and elderly residents, compounded the issue. Additionally, many individuals lacked the necessary understanding of how to navigate subsidy programs, while others struggled to afford the financial contribution required for refurbishments due to their precarious financial situations.

In response, Barcelona implemented the "Finques d'Alta Complexitat" program as part of the broader "Pla de Barris" initiative, which focuses on revitalizing deprived neighborhoods. Unlike previous approaches, this program offers subsidies covering up to 100% of refurbishment costs, contingent on the socio-economic profile of the residents. However, the key innovation lies in the proactive engagement of the public sector with the affected communities.

Rather than simply announcing the availability of subsidies, representatives from the city hall, including social workers, architects, and technicians, actively visit the targeted buildings to engage with residents. This interdisciplinary team assists residents throughout the refurbishment process, addressing any barriers or concerns that may arise. By fostering community cohesion and facilitating communication, this approach has not only increased participation in the program but also mitigated potential conflicts, such as rent hikes post-renovation.

Furthermore, the program has contributed to the preservation of social housing by converting vacant or new units into rent-controlled properties managed by the public sector. Since its inception, the "Finques d'Alta Complexitat" program has benefited 123 estates, providing support to 1,582 families and demonstrating its effectiveness in addressing the complex challenges of urban housing renewal.

Authors:

Quatre Camins

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Quatre Camins

Mismatches Location Functional adequacy Diversity Vulnerable groups
Policies and regulations
Promotion and production Public promotion

Main objectives of the project

The objective of this initiative is to construct public rental accommodations tailored for elderly residents, featuring services specifically designed to enhance mobility and accessibility. Through adaptable rents depending on the tenant’s needs and high-quality architectural design, the building stands as a prominent model of social housing in populated urban areas like Barcelona.

Date

  • 2019: Finalista
  • 2017: Construction
  • 2015: En proceso

Stakeholders

  • Architect: Ravetllat Arquitectura
  • Promotor: Ajuntament de Barcelon

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Barcelona
Country/Region: Barcelona, Spain

Description

Located in a unique area near Collserola's range in Barcelona, Spain, the site plan for this project resides within an urban fabric characterized by low density. This fabric consists of a mix of small-scale isolated family housing alongside larger educational and sanitation facilities. Addressing the challenge of integrating with the existing urban and topographical context was a key consideration during the project's implementation. The overarching objective was to adhere to PassivHaus criteria, emphasizing proper ventilation strategies, thermal insulation, PassivHaus windows, airtightness, and reduced thermal bridging. These measures were designed with a focus on simplicity for the inhabitants' ease of use.

The proposed solution involved an L-shaped building aligned with the streets and oriented to maximize exposure to the best views and sunlight, particularly towards the south or southeast. Access to the 44 dwellings, including two adapted units, is provided via a main core with stairs and elevators, supplemented by a secondary evacuation stair. Leveraging the topography allowed for the creation of two significant communal spaces where elderly residents can engage in outdoor activities. The first space, situated on the first floor, comprises a terrace directly connected to the garden, while the other, on the third floor, links with the laundry facilities and roof area.

This housing complex aims to accommodate senior citizens from low-income social segments on a lifetime rent basis. The rent fee is tailored to the users' personal income and the services provided (e.g., healthcare, food), reflecting their individual situations and autonomy levels. This adaptable fee, coupled with housing made for a targeted vulnerable community, constitutes the primary innovation of the project. Given this context, the architectural design prioritizes economic sensitivity towards its residents and emphasizes easy maintenance and energy efficiency of the apartments. Passive energy control measures take precedence to ensure residents' comfort and minimize administrative complexities.

Furthermore, the project seeks to foster social interaction both within and outside the building, promoting recreational activities that enhance residents' physical and mental well-being while fostering social cohesion within the neighborhood. In summary, the final project optimizes the opportunities presented by the site plan and urban context, demonstrating both an active and passive environmental attitude throughout the building's lifespan, as well as a socially conscious approach.

A significant innovation of the project lies in the implementation of passive energy control measures that not only simplify usage and maintenance but also minimize the ecological footprint, rendering the building environmentally friendly. Additionally, successfully integrating senior citizens into an established residential area represents a significant achievement. Future endeavors include incorporating passive energy control measures into standard administrative practices and extending social initiatives to other neighborhoods, thereby enhancing the quality of life for elderly residents and promoting societal diversity.

The project has won several awards, such as the Ibero-American Passivhaus Competition 2011 or the European Responsible Housing Awards 2019.

Authors:

APROP - Provisional Local Accommodations

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APROP - Provisional Local Accommodations

Mismatches Vulnerable groups
Policies and regulations Building capacity
Promotion and production Public promotion Innovation Materials Technology Industrialisation

Main objectives of the project

APROP is an innovative housing program designed to offer affordable, sustainable, and high-quality emergency accommodation to households facing eviction, all within their own neighborhoods. Utilizing a unique construction system built around reused shipping containers, the program prioritizes energy efficiency and innovative solutions for social housing schemes.

Date

  • 2019: Construction

Stakeholders

  • Constructor: Barcelona City Hall
  • Constructor: IMHAB

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Barcelona
Country/Region: Spain

Description

APROP (an acronym for Proximity Temporary Affordable Housing, also meaning "nearby" in Catalan), utilizing industrialized methods and recycled shipping containers, represents a municipal commitment to innovation in addressing the housing emergency. Inspired by successful projects in cities like London, Copenhagen, and Vancouver, this model offers fast, sustainable, and quality housing to prevent displacement and gentrification. Promoted by the Barcelona City Council's Department of Social Rights, the programme aims to provide temporary accommodation while more permanent but slower housing solutions are developing. APROP buildings will be distributed across the ten city districts in empty sites awaiting public facilities or permanent housing projects. The first one is already in operation in the Ciutat Vella central district and it includes 12 dwellings. APROP Ciutat Vella is a compact, 5-storey corner volume on a 186m² plot. It hosts the extension of a health facility on the ground floor and 12 dwellings on the four upper floors. All the housing units feature a living room with an open kitchen and fully accessible bathrooms. The smaller ones, 30m², have a double bedroom, while the bigger ones, 60m², include two bedrooms. The outdoor facades fully respect the landscape of the old city centre. The second generation of APROP buildings have already been built in Glòries. Every building in the programme is the result of an open competition demanding the implementation of a lightweight, dry and modular construction system based on reused shipping containers. The use of shipping containers significantly reduces environmental impacts while shortening construction times. The system is perfectly dismountable, transportable and adaptable to further locations.

APROPs serve as temporary housing and provide socio-educational support to individuals and families at risk of social exclusion, referred by social services due to unstable housing situations. With a focus on enhancing autonomy and self-sufficiency, the program emphasizes labor and training support, as well as fostering economic savings during the residency period. This comprehensive approach aims to facilitate a transition to stable housing alternatives.

Designed for temporary use, APROPs allows residents to remain close to their communities. Shipping containers are repurposed into one- or two-bedroom accommodations, featuring natural lighting, ventilation, outdoor spaces, and functional furnishings. High-quality insulation and spatial performance systems ensure thermal, acoustic, and lighting comfort for occupants. Overall, APROPs offer a holistic approach to temporary housing, integrating social support services with sustainable construction practices to address housing insecurity and promote community stability.

Authors:

Can Travi - 85 dwellings for the eldery and public facilities

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Can Travi - 85 dwellings for the eldery and public facilities

Policies and regulations
Financing
Urban Design
Ownership and tenure

Main objectives of the project

The site is on Tibidabo hillside close to the edge of Barcelona. It's a 3.500m2 trapezoidal shape with a 3,5 meters gap on the short axis and mainly horitzontal on the long one. It has an excelent south-east orientation and it has some impressive views over Barcelona.

Date

  • 2009: Construction

Stakeholders

  • Architect: Cristina Garcia Nafria
  • Architect: Gines Egea Viñas
  • Architect: Sergi Serrat Guillen

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Barcelona
Country/Region: Spain

Description

The project has to solve a program of 6500m2 of social housing with 85 dwelings for eldery people and parking space for 28 cars. There are also 2000m2 of public facilities with a civical center.

Main strategies

(1) Best orientation. All of the dwelings benefit from South-East orientation. That means a great comfort for the inhabitants and a high degree of energy saving both in illumination and climatizacion of the dwellings

(2) Housing units bars are concentrated on the north perimeter of the plot so the most of the land it's available to build the civical center while keeping both best orientation and views. The building keeps a low profile of 3 stories to integrate into the neighborhood

(3) Topographical gap is solved with the parking and the civical centrer volume. Its roof is understood as a fifth façade of the building. It's treated with a painted tennis-quick finish similar to the sportive pavement used in the urbanization of the near park. It's completely open on ground floor showing its public character to the street acting as a true activity generator for the surroundings
(4) Mix of passive and active system to ensure a good climatic behavior and energysaving strategies, such as good south east orientation for dwellings, deep terraces that protects users from excessive sunlight radiation in summer but act as energy space collectors on winter, increased insulation on roofs, water management strategies and a central heating and hot water production system with solar contribution (35% of CO2 emission savings)
(5) Economic containment. White and void are the only materials used for the composition of the facade. Taking advantage of Mediterranean benevolent climatic conditions terraces function as condensers of activity enhancing the sense of community of the users. It is the place where domestic and civic activities occurs and are shown to the city. They are like the central courtyard of the houses of the Algerian Kashba but placed in a vertical plane. The size (2,5x2,5x2,5) of those voids goes beyond the scale of housing units and speaks on a level closer to the scale of the building and the city. The set of all those different actions and activities are integrated into the building volume due to the inner position of the terrace. The repetition of the void turns the facade into a chess texture. The white background unifies it all as does the snow fallen on the landscape.

(6) Housing units are the core of the system. Unit plan layout creates the longest interior diagonals possible so the space is perceived in its maximal length. Services areas are placed

on the north side (corridor, maintenance, bath, kitchen) while relation areas (living, bedroom, terraces) are faced to south.

127 Social Dwellings Building

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127 Social Dwellings Building

Policies and regulations
Urban Design
Promotion and production
Ownership and tenure

Main objectives of the project

Mediating between both, past and present, craftsmanship and technology.

Date

  • 2011: Construction

Stakeholders

  • Architect: Víctor Setoain
  • Architect: Neus Lacomba
  • Architect: Eduard Bru

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Barcelona
Country/Region: Spain

Description

The site was a bastion and a door in the third city wall in Barcelona. After this, it became a hospital, a prison, a square and swimming pool.

The site is now a inhabited door between the Eixample and the Raval. The project mediates between both, between past and present, between craftsmanship and technology.

The program is social housing and dwellings for the elderly people. There is also a passage and a communal courtyard, in the lower floors public facilities are located.

The volume accomplishes two different urban scales:

First, that of the Raval district:

•The project creates a small square, which provides a better natural lighting and ventilation to narrow streets.

•The project incorporates the traditional balcony and blind, which gradually filter a relationship of the public and private domains.

And second, the building achieves the urban height of the Eixample.

Design has pursued sustainable principles, searching for energetic self-sufficiency and passive regulation of the interior temperature according to the following elements:

•Optimized size of overtures in main façades (SW and NE), providing mobile sun protection (roll-up blinds).

•In order to reinforce solar protection in over-exposed areas (above 6th level), balconies incorporate in addition fixed structures for vegetal species, reducing solar incidence over the window.

Passive and active elements configure a building of high energetic efficiency, from the architectural design of the façade to the installation of air conditioning. The building approaches self-sufficiency, as it is currently demanded.

The selection of materials and construction details has been done in consideration of their life span cycle. Low incorporated energy, durability and scarce or non-existent maintenance have become criteria for the selection of materials. Amongst main materials:

•Natural wood with autoclave treatment, without varnish, for banisters and benches.

•Terrazzo pavements.

•Lime stucco without paint for all façades.
Low incorporated energy materials.

All dwellings provide crossed ventilation. Size, location and practicability of overtures allow crossed ventilation according to their inhabitants’ needs, by controlling it. Roll-up blinds are a key element in the strategy, protecting from direct solar radiation while allowing natural ventilation.

Balconies are designed for obtaining a good natural lighting for rooms as well as for avoiding excessive solar radiation along.

Greenery in the interior courtyard provides a garden inside built environment, diminishing the heat during the warmest months of the year.

110 ROOMS. Collective Housing

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110 ROOMS. Collective Housing

Policies and regulations
Promotion and production
Ownership and tenure

Main objectives of the project

The collective housing contains a system of 110 rooms, which can be used as desired. Answering to the client’s demand, each apartment can be expanded or reduced adding or subtracting rooms in order to answer to inhabitants needs. With that flexibility in mind, rooms are similar eliminating any type of spatial hierarchy and program predetermination.

Date

  • 2016: Rehabilitación

Stakeholders

  • Architect: Guillermo López Ibáñez
  • Architect: Alfredo Lérida Horta
  • Architect: Anna Puigjaner Barberá
  • Architect: María Charneco Llanos

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Barcelona
Country/Region: Spain

Description

The building is designed as a system of similar rooms. So each apartment can be sized and programed depending on the need.

For the next years, each floor is divided as a set of 4 apartments of 5 rooms. Rooms are connected, no corridor is needed. A kitchenette is placed in the middle acting as the center, the other rooms will be used as bedrooms and livingrooms. This flexibility is able due to the position of bathrooms, where all installations are placed as points for supply. The interior patio is roofless allowing natural ventilation, an important factor for comfort and consume control.

The ground floor refers to Eixample’s traditional halls where marbles and large spaces define the place of reception and representation. The facade as well searches to consolidate the traditional style of the area, where prevail opaque stucco walls with vertical openings and balconies.
This project is born from the radicalization of everything that seems to us valuable from Eixample’s typological tradition. Thus, floor plants are formalized following the distribution of equal (or almost equal) rooms that traditionally characterized late XIX C. housing in the area, and have modified their use throughout the decades without substantial changes. A rigid system that allows changing its use over time.

Something similar happens with the façade, where the traditional archetypal composition has simply been replicated to consolidate the preexistent: vertical openings, balconies and wood shutters. Zero invention, pure reproduction. The façade finishing is done with traditional lime stucco, which, as often happened, represents through its pattern the memory of its old inhabitants.

The ground floor recovers the popular language of old Eixample’s halls, where, through furniture and large habitable objects, the space was arranged to house different uses. Here, these furnitures are transformed into marble volumes in the middle of a large open space (where it literally rains allowing to understand the hall as an extension of the street)
The building structure is defined by a mixed system. In the ground floor a metallic structure forms each volume, and supports the building loads. The rest of the floors are supported by a reticular grid of concrete pillars and slabs, which define an order that allows future changes.

The construction system rationalizes costs and optimizes long-term use. Thus, the constructive solutions follow the tradition of the Eixample’s neighborhood, where the building is placed. Solutions which have been already used during decades there, proofing to be successful and efficient.

At the exterior façade, a ceramic layer with thermal insulation is suspended covering completely the structure and the inner enclosure. This sheet defines a continuous base for the finishing coating, which is a two-color lime stucco following the traditional neighborhood façade type. The exterior carpentry is done with laminated pine wood, complemented with traditional wood shutters for sun and ventilation regulation, increasing the building’s energetic efficiency.

In the interior, all the partitions are done with dry wall systems, allowing easy future changes in room connections.

Mixed dwelling building in 22@

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Mixed dwelling building in 22@

Financing
Urban Design
Promotion and production
Ownership and tenure

Main objectives of the project

Social dwellings with shelters for the most vulnerable groups, combined together with Urban Responsibility by generating public space with an interior street, Social Responsibility by matching the conditions of the different programs and Environmental Responsibility by implementing passive design strategies such as the winter garden.

Date

  • 2018: Construction

Stakeholders

  • Architect: Judith Leclerc
  • Architect: Jaime Coll

Location

Continent: Europe
City: Barcelona
Country/Region: Spain

Description

For the first time in Barcelona, two usually separate programs are combined into the same building: social housing with temporary shelters for the inclusion of the most vulnerable groups. The design of the overall project responds to 3 basic criteria: Urban Responsibility by generating public space with an interior street that both separates and visually links both programs. Social Responsibility by matching the conditions of the different programs. Environmental Responsibility by implementing passive design strategies such as the winter garden and obtaining an A energy rating label.
The challenge of this project is to include social reinsertion as one more vector of the design process along with sustainability. Inclusion and accessibility of marginalized people starts with its inclusion in the program. For the first time in Barcelona, two usually separate programs are combined in the same building: official rental housing with temporary shelter accommodation for most vulnerable groups. We seek to integrate them not to stigmatize them.

Its location on a former industrial plot in the new central area of Glories, aims at reinforcing its urban presence by accumulating all the public programs on the ground floor. The constructive concept seeks the same level of comfort for all users taking advantage of the natural characteristics of the site: maximizing solar exposure and cross ventilation on a corner plot. Solar gains are reinforced by the incorporation of a winter garden facing south and large loggias facing the western corner. The solar gain of these intermediate spaces has been simulated with Designbuilder and complemented with highly efficient systems such as aerotermia and double flow ventilation thus achieving an A energy rating.
The selection of material is entirely from the Iberian Peninsula, aiming for the most natural, breathable and healthy as possible, including the invisible ones like the insulation. The ventilated enclosure of Faveton extruded ceramic pieces allows for a great comfort with little insulation (8 cm only). The corrugated design minimizes the weight of the piece and considerably reduces the substructure. This vertical undulated surface brings warmth and light to the façade and these same ripples have been reproduced on the mold of the latticework giving a homogeneous quality to all parts of the envelope and dissimulating domestic activities such as drying clothes. The rest of flooring and ceiling materials have a high thermal resistance for a better inertia like exposed concrete and terrazzo whereas mobile materials such as entrance doors and Barcelona blinds in the balconies use a warm and renewable material: Wood.